The Asset Allocation Puzzle

Possessing a considerable amount of knowledge about stocks, bonds, and cash is only a small part of the investment planning process. Many investors are under the false notion that the greatest determinant of
portfolio performance is the specific investment choices they make. Actually, the biggest decision you will make is how much to allocate to different investment categories.

Asset allocation is all about finding the mix of investments that is right for your situation. Goals, time horizon, risk tolerance and risk capacity are some of the key factors that should be considered when allocating assets.

Goals

Determining what asset allocation is appropriate depends largely on the goals you seek to achieve. Are you saving for retirement, college education for your children, or a vacation home? Each goal must be considered in creating the appropriate asset mix.

Time horizon

Time horizon is the length of time a portfolio will remain invested before withdrawals are made. If your investment horizon is fairly short, you’d likely want a more conservative portfolio—one with returns that do not fluctuate much. If your investment horizon is longer, you could invest more aggressively.

Risk Tolerance

Everyone has a different emotional reaction to sudden changes in their portfolio value. Some people have trouble sleeping at night, while others are unfazed by fluctuations in the market. Risk tolerance is a personal preference and should be tailored to you specifically. However, when determining an appropriate asset allocation mix, it is important to consider not only one’s risk tolerance, but also one’s risk capacity.

Risk Capacity

An investor’s risk tolerance refers to his or her aversion to risk, while an investor’s risk capacity relates to his or her ability to assume risk. Sometimes, an investor’s risk capacity and risk tolerance do not match
up. If an investor’s capacity to take risk is low but the risk tolerance is high, then the portfolio should be reallocated more conservatively to prevent taking unnecessary risk. On the other hand, if an investor’s risk capacity is high but the risk tolerance is low, reallocating the portfolio more aggressively may be necessary to meet future return goals. In either
case, speaking with a financial advisor may help to determine if your risk tolerance and risk capacity are in sync.

Have questions or need a second opinion? Contact us today to learn more or to schedule a free consultation.

PFG Private Wealth Management, LLC is a registered investment adviser.  Information presented is for educational purposes only and does not intend to make an offer or solicitation for the sale or purchase of any specific securities, investments, or investment strategies. This material and information are not intended to provide tax or legal advice.  Investments involve risk and, unless otherwise stated, are not guaranteed.  Be sure to first consult with a qualified financial adviser and/or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed herein. Past performance is not indicative of future performance.

Concerned About Longevity? Three Mistakes to Avoid

Longevity is often cheered as an achievement, but the downside of living well beyond one’s average life expectancy is that it can strain (or worse, completely deplete) an individual’s financial resources. The first step in addressing longevity risk is to evaluate just how great the odds are that either you or your spouse will have a much longer-than-average life span. Health considerations, family longevity history, employment choices, and income level may all be factors. If you’ve assessed these considerations and are concerned about longevity risk—or if you’ve determined that you’d
simply rather be safe than sorry—here are three key mistakes to avoid.

Mistake 1: Holding a Too-Conservative Portfolio.

When investors think about reducing risk in their portfolios, they often set their sights on curtailing short-term volatility—the risk that their portfolios will lose 10% or even 20% in a given year. But a too-conservative portfolio (one that emphasizes cash and bonds at the expense of stocks) can actually enhance shortfall risk while keeping a lid on short-term volatility. But, right
now, interest rates have much more room to move up than they do down, which may reduce the opportunity for bond-price appreciation during the next decade. With such low returns, retirees with too-safe portfolios may not even outearn the inflation rate over time.

Mistake 2: Not Delaying Social Security Filing.

Because it provides an inflation-adjusted income stream for the rest of your life, Social Security is designed to provide you with at least some money coming in the door even if your investment portfolio runs low (or out) during your later years. If you file early (you’re eligible to do so as early as age 62), you permanently reduce your annual benefit from the program. Delayed filing, on the other hand, has the opposite effect, amping up the value of your hedge. Not only will your benefits last as long as you do, but they’ll be higher, perhaps even substantially so, as well. Those who
delay filing until age 70 may receive an annual benefit that’s more than 30% higher than what they would have received had they filed at full retirement age (currently 66) and more than 50% higher than their benefit had they filed at age 62.

Mistake 3: Not Adjusting Withdrawal-Rate Assumptions.

Just as savings rates are the main determinant of success during the accumulation years (much more than investment selection, in fact), spending rate is one of the central determinants of retirement plans’ viability. The 4% rule, which indicates that you can withdraw 4% of your total portfolio balance in year 1 of retirement, then annually inflation-adjust that dollar amount to determine each subsequent year’s portfolio payout, is a decent starting point in the sustainable withdrawal-rate
discussion. But it’s important to tweak your withdrawal rate based on your own situation. If you have a sparkling health record and it looks likely that you’ll be retired longer than the 30-year withdrawal period that underpins
the 4% rule, you may be better off starting a bit lower. In a similar vein, it’s important to not set and forget your retirement-plan variables, such as your spending rate and your asset allocation, because retirement progresses and new information becomes available about your health and potential longevity, market valuations, and so forth.

For more information or to schedule a free consultation with one of our advisors, please call (813) 286-7776.

PFG Private Wealth Management, LLC is a registered investment adviser. Information presented is for educational purposes only and does not intend to make an offer or solicitation for the sale or purchase of any specific securities, investments, or investment strategies. This material and information are not intended to provide tax or legal advice.  Investments involve risk and, unless otherwise stated, are not guaranteed.  Be sure to first consult with a qualified financial adviser and/or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed herein.